Stem Cell Therapy Reduced Angina Frequency for ‘No-Option’ Patients

A two-year clinical study with over 160 patients with refractory angina (chronic symptomatic coronary artery disease) randomized to low and high dose CD34+ cells or placebo has revealed that patients who received CD34 had a significant reduction in angina frequency over patients who received placebo.

Illustration depicting angina. Image credit: Blausen Gallery 2014 / Wikiversity Journal of Medicine, doi: 10.15347/wjm/2014.010.
“There are an increasing number of patients with advanced coronary artery disease that are not amenable to surgical or percutaneous revascularization,” said study co-author Dr. Timothy D. Henry of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.
“These patients frequently have symptoms after having had standard therapies and are left with limited treatment options.”
“Enco… Read more

Stem Cell Therapy Reduced Angina Frequency for ‘No-Option’ Patients

A two-year clinical study with over 160 patients with refractory angina (chronic symptomatic coronary artery disease) randomized to low and high dose CD34+ cells or placebo has revealed that patients who received CD34 had a significant reduction in angina frequency over patients who received placebo.

Illustration depicting angina. Image credit: Blausen Gallery 2014 / Wikiversity Journal of Medicine, doi: 10.15347/wjm/2014.010.
“There are an increasing number of patients with advanced coronary artery disease that are not amenable to surgical or percutaneous revascularization,” said study co-author Dr. Timothy D. Henry of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.
“These patients frequently have symptoms after having had standard therapies and are left with… Read more

Bumblebees Use Vibrating Hairs to Detect Floral Electric Fields

Mechanosensory hairs may explain how bumblebees sense electric signals transmitted by flowers, says a team of scientists at the University of Bristol, UK.

A bumblebee covered in body hairs. Image credit: University of Bristol.
Bumblebees use information from surrounding electric fields to make foraging decisions.
However, how they detect these fields has been a mystery – until now.
Focusing on the buff-tailed bumblebee ( Bombus terrestris ), Bristol scientists tested two potential mechanisms that would allow the insects to detect electric fields through the insulating medium of dry air: deflections of either the antenna or hairs.
Using a laser to measure vibrations, they found that both the antenna and mechanosensory hairs deflect in response to an electri… Read more

Sharks Have Distinct Personalities, New Study Finds

Sharks of the same species can have different personalities, indicates a new study published in the Journal of Fish Biology .

Port Jackson shark ( Heterodontus portusjacksoni ). Image credit: Evan Byrnes.
The study, led by Dr. Evan Byrnes of Macquarie University in North Ryde, Australia, examined interindividual personality differences between Port Jackson sharks ( Heterodontus portusjacksoni ).
Trials were designed to test the sharks’ boldness, which is a measure of their propensity to take risks, but also an influencer of individual health through its correlation with stress hormones and associated physiological profiles.
Port Jackson sharks were first introduced to a tank where they were provided with shelter, and timed to see how long it took for each sh… Read more

Biologists Solve Mystery of Blue-Green Bird Eggs

Blue-green egg color shields bird embryos from harmful sunlight, according to Dr. David Lahti from the City University of New York and Dr. Dan Ardia from Franklin & Marshall College.

Blue-green eggs of the Eastern bluebird ( Sialia sialis ). Image credit: Eastern Kentucky University.
The authors tested the hypothesis that pigmentation might help an egg strike a balance between two opposing and potentially damaging effects of the Sun: light transmission into light-colored eggs, and heating up of dark-colored eggs.
“We quantitatively test four components of this hypothesis,” they wrote in a paper published in the May issue of The American Naturalist , “on variably colored eggs of the village weaverbird ( Ploceus cucullatus ) in a controlled light environment:
(i… Read more

Silver Boa: Scientists Discover New Snake Species in Bahamas

A team of researchers led by Dr. Graham Reynolds from the University of North Carolina Asheville has discovered a new species of non-venomous boid snake on the Conception Island Bank, Bahamas.

The Conception Bank silver boa ( Chilabothrus argentums ). Image credit: Graham Reynolds.
Dr. Reynolds and his colleagues named this new species Chilabothrus argentums and gave it the common name Conception Bank silver boa.
Research describing the new snake is published in the May 2016 issue of the journal Breviora .
“This study represents the first new in situ discovery of a West Indian Boa species in 73 years,” the scientists said.
“It has been at least 58 years since the in situ discovery of new populations of taxonomically distinct boas in the region, the last being the repor… Read more

Cephalopods Thrive in World’s Oceans

According to a new study published in the journal Current Biology , cephalopods’ numbers have increased in the world’s oceans over the past six decades.

Giant Australian cuttlefish ( Sepia apama ) in Spencer Gulf, South Australia. Image credit: David Wiltshire.
Cephalopods are a diverse group of highly developed mollusks that includes squid, cuttlefish, octopuses and nautiloids.
They have a unique set of biological traits, including rapid growth, short lifespans and strong life-history plasticity, allowing them to adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions.
There has been growing speculation that cephalopod populations are proliferating in response to a changing environment.
To investigate long-term trends in cephalopod abundance, the stud… Read more

Culture-Bound Syndromes: Entire Disease Category Your Doctor May Be Missing

Jumping Frenchmen of Maine, a rare disorder characterized by an unusually extreme startle reaction, is similar to Latah. It was first identified during the 19th century in Maine and Quebec among an isolated population of lumberjacks of French Canadian descent. This image shows a group of lumberjacks who have just downed a giant sequoia (California, 1905). Image credit: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
How is that possible?
A physician goes through four years of medical school, at least two-three years of residency (postgraduate medical training), and potential fellowships.
Why would a doctor not know about an entire category of disease?
Answer: Physicians, themselves, are confused about these mysterious diseases.
Let me elaborate.
Physicians are not always sure how to treat culture-bou… Read more

Culture-Bound Syndromes: Entire Disease Category Your Doctor May Be Missing

Jumping Frenchmen of Maine, a rare disorder characterized by an unusually extreme startle reaction, is similar to Latah. It was first identified during the 19th century in Maine and Quebec among an isolated population of lumberjacks of French Canadian descent. This image shows a group of lumberjacks who have just downed a giant sequoia (California, 1905). Image credit: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
How is that possible?
A physician goes through four years of medical school, at least two-three years of residency (postgraduate medical training), and potential fellowships.
Why would a doctor not know about an entire category of disease?
Answer: Physicians, themselves, are confused about these mysterious diseases.
Let me elaborate.
Physicians are not a… Read more

Invasive Nile Crocodiles Were Captured in Florida, DNA Study Confirms

Using DNA analysis, scientists have confirmed the capture of Nile crocodiles ( Crocodylus niloticus ) in South Florida.

A Nile crocodile ( Crocodylus niloticus ). Image credit: Tambako the Jaguar.
The Nile crocodile is a large species native to the rivers, lakes and swamps of Africa. It can reach up to 7 m in length and up to 730 kg in weight and is known to prey upon crustaceans, arachnids, insects, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.
Now three juveniles of this African species have been found in South Florida, swimming in the Everglades and relaxing on a house porch in Miami.
“The invasive crocodiles were captured between 2000 and 2014, leading us to analyze their DNA, study their diet and one of the animal’s growth,” said co-author Dr. Kenneth Krysko, a r… Read more

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