Wildlife At The Hampstead Heath Birding Pond

Paragould Police Detective Jack Hailey and other officers quickly responded after they were informed about the serpent sighting. Based on their investigation, it seemed the snakes were dropped on purpose.
(Photo : Carl Court/Getty Images)
An unidentified perpetrator has dropped a ball of about 40 snakes in the parking lot of Walmart at Paragould, Arkansas.
According to the United Press International, Paragould Police Detective Jack Hailey and other officers quickly responded after they were informed about the serpent sighting. Based on their investigation, it seemed the snakes were dropped on purpose.
«They were either herding the snakes when they were frog gigging or something,» Hailey told ABC 8.   «Either way, they were collecting them for this reason and I don’t think that was the best thing to do at all. Especially, those out there with a phobia.»
People who have seen the snak… Read more

Dinosaur

(Photo : Nicky Loh/Getty Images)
The Ghostbusters monster dubbed Zuul, a horned demon-like creature who famously emerged from the refrigerator, has now inspired the name of a newly discovered 75-million-year-old dinosaur.
«Me and my co-author David Evans were batting around ideas for what to name it, and I just half-jokingly said, «It looks like Zuul from Ghostbusters,»» co-author Victoria Arbour of the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and University of Toronto told CBC News. «Once we put that out there we couldn’t not name it that.»
According to a report from The Guardian, the Zuul was one of the most complete specimens ever found with a complete skull, a tail club and preserved soft tissues. The scientists excavated a quarry in Montana where they were able to find the fossils in a remarkably well-preserved state.
The size of the plant-eating animal is impressive, stretching six meters (… Read more

anti-aging

ISTANBUL, TURKEY — FEBRUARY 15: A poster promoting an anti-ageing treatment is seen on a wall inside the luxury Esteworld Clinic on February 15, 2017 in Istanbul, Turkey.
(Photo : Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
Blood from human umbilical cords just may be the key in fighting back aging. Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine found that the protein located in the blood can actually boost learning and memory in older mice, opening the potential of new treatments for age-related mental declines, according to a report from Medical Xpress.
«Neuroscientists have ignored it and are still ignoring it, but to me it’s remarkable that something in your blood can influence the way you think,» senior author Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD, explained. Wyss-Coray participated in a previous study that showed older mice displaying improved memory and learning after the infusion of young… Read more

orcas

Monterey Bay is a hunting ground for killer whales, especially during this season when grey whales migrate from Mexico to California. This year’s migration was later than usual, so the hungry killer whales were waiting ravenously.
(Photo : Mike Aguilera/SeaWorld San Diego via Getty Images)
Killer whales are truly living up to their name. Last week marked an unusual string of killer whale killings that shocked even experienced marine biologists.
According to a report from SFGate, there have been four kills in seven days by a pod of nine killer whales in Monterey Bay — roughly one every other day. This strange killing spree baffles scientists, particularly Monteray Bay Whale Watch«s Nancy Black, who described the frequency of the pod»s attacks «unprecedented.»
«This has never happened in my thirty years,» Black said. “Just to witness that out in nature when you usually see that kind… Read more

Snakes

Snake sightings are on the rise because the temperature is heating up. What Christine has captured seems like several snakes mating.
(Photo : Nurcholis Anhari Lubis/Getty Images)
A woman from Charlotte has stumbled upon a «ball of snakes» while walking along the Little Sugar Creek Greenway.
The woman, identified as Christine Proffitt based on her social media page, managed to snap a photo of the swirling serpents and shared it on twitter with a caption: «Watch out on the greenway today guys.»
Speaking with CBS North Carolina, Christine said she sprinted away from the ball of snakes as soon as she finished taking photos.
«I would have taken more but I wanted to get out of there as fast as I could,» she kidded. «As terrified as I was, my first instinct was ‘pics or it didn«t happen.»»

Snake sightings are on the rise because the temperature is heating up. What Christine has captured seems like se… Read more

Jellyfish

Are jellies our oldest known living ancestor?
(Photo : Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Where did humans come from? The answer might be jellies.
In a new paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, scientists from the Vanderbilt University and University of Wisconsin-Madison suggested that ctenophores or comb jellies were the first animals on Earth.
For years, the scientific community has been debating whether jellies or sponges came first. Both creatures emerged around 500 million years ago, but one has to come first, right?
According to a report from Gizmodo, this recent study used a new genetic technique to conclude that the oldest of all animal species are the comb jellies, although the interpretative nature of the data might mean that the debate might be far from over.
To prove that the comb jelly has the most ancient genome in the world, the researchers a… Read more

Turtle eggs

The Burmese roofed turtle (Batagur trivittata) is so rare that in 2014, only one egg from the critically endangered species was found. It’s estimated that there are only five remaining Burmese roofed turtles in the wild.
(Photo : Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Turtle Survival Alliance have stumbled upon the Easter eggs of a lifetime. They have discovered 44 eggs of the Burmese roofed turtle, one of the rarest reptiles in the world.
According to a report from Seeker, the Burmese roofed turtle ( Batagur trivittata ) is so rare that in 2014, only one egg from the critically endangered species was found. Only five remaining Burmese roofed turtles are left in the wild.
Steven Platt, a regional herpetologist at WCS Myanmar, said the major breakthrough doesn’t end with the discovery of the rare turtle eggs, they still have to determin… Read more

Endangered Blue Whales Spotted Off California Coast

There are only about 10,000 to 25,000 blue whales globally, making them an endangered species. Climate change poses threat to its population, as warmer temperature may kill krill population, blue whale’s top prey.
(Photo : David McNew/Getty Images)
A drone footage of a blue whale feeding off the New Zealand Coast has been captured by researchers from the Oregon State University.  The rare recording shows that the big mammals are picky eaters, and they won’t consume the meal, unless its size is worth their effort.
On the video (see below), the big mammal is seen lunging towards a big patch of krill, roughly about its size. As it approaches its meal diligently, it turns on its side, pumps its flukes and increases its speed to about 6.7 miles per hour. On the other hand, another scenario shows the whale passing through a smaller patch of krill without feeding on it.
“Modeling studies of blue wha… Read more

Prize Shark

A fisherman kneels beside a dead shark lying belly up on a quayside.
(Photo : Fox Photos/Getty Images)
The recent shark attack in Australia, which killed Laeticia Brouwer, a 17-year-old teenager surfing at a popular surfer break known as Kelp Beds, has fueled a debate whether the government should resort to shark culling.
According to the Australian Marine Conservation Society, culling was used earlier in Western Australia to capture and kill sharks. It involves the use of baited drumlines. Once the shark gets into the trap, they will be shot or killed.
Federal Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg and O’Connor MP Rick Wilson were among the first ones to say that the WA government should use the culling as a technique to prevent more shark attacks.
«After 15 shark fatalities in less than 20 years in Western Australia it’s time the [WA] Government put people first and sharks second,» Fry… Read more

Penguins

Two of the most common species of penguins in Antarctica have experienced severe decline due to climate change.
(Photo : prpix.com.au via Getty Images)
A new study by the non-profit organization Oceanites, in collaboration with researchers from Stony Brook University in New York and NASA, revealed that two of the most common species of penguins in Antarctica have experienced a severe decline due to climate change.
The study, dubbed as the «State of Antarctic Penguin» report 2017, showed that the population of Antarctic penguins has dropped by over 25 percent on average over the past 20 years. Sadly, both the adélie penguin population in Petermann Island and the chinstrap colony at Baily Head on Deception Island experience more than 50 percent decline.
“In one generation, I have personally witnessed the precipitous decline of once-abundant Adélie and chinstrap penguin populati… Read more

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